HURRICANE HARVEY RELIEF CONCERT

CAN'd Aid & Live For Live Music Present

HURRICANE HARVEY RELIEF CONCERT

Anders Osborne, Members of The Motet + Kim Dawson of Pimps of Joytime, Members of The Infamous Stringdusters, Members of of Sunsquabi, Eddie Roberts (The New Mastersounds), Chuck Jones (Dopapod), Congo Sanchez (Thievery Corporation), One Flew West

Tue Sep 12

Doors: 6:30 pm / Show: 7:30 pm

Boulder Theater

$20 - $25

Tickets at the Door

This event is 21 and over

All proceeds benefit CAN’d Aid’s Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund to provide canned drinking water and on the ground rebuilding efforts.

Ages 21+ NO EXCEPTIONS

All tickets are non-exchangeable and non-refundable following purchase

Listed price does not include tax and service charge

Price is the same online, over the phone, or in the Box Office.

NO BAGS

Hurricane Harvey Relief Concert
- Anders Osborne
- Dave Watts, Ryan Jalbert, Joey Porter, Garrett Sayers, Gabriel Mervine, Drew Sayers, Lyle Divinsky (of The Motet) + Kim Dawson (of Pimps of Joytime)
- Andy Hall, Chris Pandolfi, and Jeremy Garrett (of the Infamous Stringdusters)
- Kevin Donohue, Josh Fairman, and Chris Anderson (of Sunsquabi)
- Eddie Roberts (The New Mastersounds) , Chuck Jones (Dopapod), Congo Sanchez (Thievery Corporation) & Joey Porter (The Motet)
- One Flew West
Anders Osborne
Anders Osborne
Between the potency of his richly detailed songwriting, his intensely emotional, soulful vocals and his piercing, expert guitar work, New Orleans’ Anders Osborne is a true musical treasure. He is among the most original and visionary musicians writing and performing today. Guitar Player calls him “the poet laureate of Louisiana’s fertile roots music scene.” New Orleans' Gambit Weekly has honored Osborne as the Entertainer Of The Year. OffBeat named him the Crescent City’s Best Guitarist for the third year in a row, and the Best Songwriter for the second straight year. Osborne also won Song Of The Year for his composition, Louisiana Gold.

Osborne’s latest released Flower Box, his second full-length album of 2016, recorded in his hometown of New Orleans late last year, Flowerbox is a heavier, guitar-driven follow-up to the acclaimed Spacedust & Ocean Views.

"I love the way this record comes out stout and determined right out the gate, a four-piece rock & roll band making beautiful and conquering noise," says Osborne. "The producer, Mark Howard, has a way of making you play in the moment and being confident. His sounds and engineering style is that of classic records, with his own special sauce of 'haunting' on top of it. The musicians on here are undoubtedly some of my absolute favorites in the world, both as players and as people. Their contributions are invaluable. Scott Metzger, Brady Blade, Carl Dufrene, Chad Cromwell, Marc Broussard, David LaBruyere, Rob McNelley & Justin Tocket. Bad boys! I've been wanting to make this record for several years and I am stoked it's finally here."

A powerful live performer, the musician has won over fans through non-stop touring as well as a heralded collaboration with the North Mississippi Allstars & Southern Soul Assembly.

Jambands.com said, "Osborne finds a striking balance of muscle and grace that allows for the smaller moments of quiet to be just as resounding as the sonic booms." And USA Today has praised his music, saying "The relentless approach amplifies the anguished lyrics, which appear to be about the death of a loved one or a relationship torn asunder or perhaps a spiritual crisis." In a review of Spacedust & Ocean Views, Boulder Weekly said the album "finds the guitarist in a (largely) reflective mood, an extended meditation on place and moments in time, memory, passages through and exits from paragraphs in the non-fiction docudrama of life. Through languid, gently formed figures, Osborne coaxes odes of gratitude and compelling imagery in what seems a little like a travelogue — like watching his kid chasing seabirds on the beach..."

Osborne has earned hordes of new fans. He has toured virtually non-stop, either with his own band, as a solo artist, or as a guest with his countless musical admirers, including Toots and The Maytals, Stanton Moore, Derek Trucks, Warren Haynes, Keb Mo, The Grateful Dead’s Phil Lesh, Jackie Greene and Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe. He’s produced and played on critically acclaimed albums by Tab Benoit, Johnny Sansone and Mike Zito.

Since his recording debut in 1989, Osborne has written virtually all of his own material and contributed memorable songs to a wide variety of artists. Two tunes co-written by Osborne appear on Keb Mo’s Grammy-winning 1999 release Slow Down. Country superstar Tim McGraw scored a #1 hit with Anders’ song Watch The Wind Blow By. Osborne’s compositions have been covered by artists as diverse as Brad Paisley, Tab Benoit, Jonny Lang, Edwin McCain, Sam Bush, Trombone Shorty and Aaron Neville and Kim Carnes. His songs have appeared in multiple feature films. He can also be seen performing in an episode of HBO’s New Orleans-based drama, Treme.
Members of The Motet + Kim Dawson of Pimps of Joytime
Members of The Motet + Kim Dawson of Pimps of Joytime
The future of funk is clear on The Motet’s new self-released studio album, Totem, which hits streets July 8, 2016. The 12 tracks on Totem, all originals, cover a lot of ground stylistically while never losing sight of the groove. Produced by Lettuce and Soulive guitarist Eric Krasno, Totem was written collectively by the seven members of the band. Each song is steeped in The Motet’s signature style that slaps you in the face with sounds that are fresh and unique.

The recent addition of singer Lyle Divinsky, who joined the band in early 2016, fans the flames of this already hot band. His sinfully soulful voice and rich lyrics are powerfully prevalent throughout Totem. “There was a month and a half between the time I joined the band and when we went into the studio,” explains Divinsky. “I wound up writing the lyrics and melodies to four songs, and re-wrote the lyrics to two. It gave me and the band an opportunity to really connect musically. We’re deeply proud of this album and it’s very exciting to have this new material to push out as we begin this next phase of The Motet’s journey.”

The brilliance of The Motet is that they do not mimic bands of the past, but rather create new, authentic sounds in a language from the past. One might explain the difference like the process of writing a poem in Old English or Aramaic: first, you have to learn the language by digging into the past, then you can express yourself in the present - and say anything you want - using that language.

No matter how you choose to express funk, you can’t fake it - and you sure as hell can’t play it - if you don’t know where to find it.

Just how did The Motet find the funk? Simply put, they dissected it. “We have put together funk-themed Halloween shows for the past fifteen years, where we pay tribute to a particular artist or play a ‘Mixtape’ set of music culled from a certain year,” shares Dave Watts.

Past Halloween cover sets have included tributes to Herbie Hancock, Earth, Wind & Fire, Stevie Wonder, Prince, Parliament-Funkadelic and many others. Recent tribute shows have celebrated a particular year in music, with ‘Mixtape’ sets from 1975, 1977, and 1980. “Preparing for these shows are intense, and we take it very seriously. Each year it gives us an incredible opportunity to not just learn, but to understand, the art of funk – both as individual players and as a band.” These shows, which have become a beloved live music tradition and sell out each year, have also offered a unique (and rowdy) opportunity for the band’s fans to join them in their ongoing exploration of creative, live dance music.

The Motet began in 1998 in Denver, Colorado, where the band’s then-rotating cast of musicians amassed an enthusiastic and loyal throng of hometown fans. The Motet took their infectious dance parties on the road about three years ago, and their national fan base has been growing exponentially ever since. Today their shows sell out from coast to coast at such venues as Red Rock’s Amphitheatre, Brooklyn Bowl, Chicago’s Park West, The Independent in San Francisco, Tipitina’s in New Orleans, Portland’s Crystal Ballroom, and Variety Playhouse in Atlanta. A favorite along the festival circuit, The Motet has performed at Electric Forest, Summer Camp, All Good Music Festival, High Sierra Music Festival, Bonnoroo, Peach Fest and many others.

The Motet are Dave Watts (drums), Joey Porter (keyboards), Garrett Sayers (bass), Ryan Jalbert (guitar), Gabriel Mervine (trumpet), Lyle Divinsky (vocals), Drew Sayers (saxophone).
Members of The Infamous Stringdusters
Members of The Infamous Stringdusters
Unlike rock 'n' roll, bluegrass music's boundaries are often defined in very narrow terms and that has caused some bands to carefully consider their place within the genre. But, in order to survive, everything must evolve... even bluegrass. Enter the Infamous Stringdusters, the very model of a major modern bluegrass band.

“At a certain point in our career, there was hesitation in calling us a bluegrass band,” guitarist Andy Falco admits. “These days, we’re much more comfortable with that label.” Banjo man Chris Pandolfi echoes the point: “We love bluegrass, but we have been influenced by other genres as much, if not more. When it comes to making music, we always try to be a blank slate and give new songs whatever they need to come to life. We just try to make something good, something that is true to who we are.”

On Laws of Gravity, that's exactly what the Infamous Stringdusters — Andy Hall (dobro), Jeremy Garrett (fiddle), and Travis Book (double bass), in addition to Falco and Pandolfi — have done. Their seventh studio set further proves that the band's collective whole is far greater than the sum of its individual parts, as the song selection and pitch-perfect performances weighs the Stringdusters' appeal to traditional fans against their musical quest to attract new listeners. It's a balance that comes naturally to the band.

Here, trad-leaning tunes like “Freedom,” “A Hard Life Makes a Good Song,” “Maxwell,” and “1901: A Canyon Odyssey” pick hard and soar high, letting trade-off solos and layered vocal harmonies work their magic. As it continues on, Gravity reaches its roots deep and wide, but never sacrifices the wings of the band, as exemplified in tracks like “Back Home” and “This Ol' Building” which pull from the blues and R&B strands of the Stringdusters' musical DNA.

“The specific feelings in those songs lend themselves to a soulful sound,” Hall explains. “The longing of 'Back Home,' the passion of 'This Ol' Building.' Slowing things down a bit, but still having a real edge and passion is the essence of that. And probably a bit of maturity on our part brings out a more authentic soulful sound.”

Indeed, the Stringdusters have worked hard to become the band they are or, perhaps, the band they wanted and knew themselves to be — a self-discovery process to which Laws of Gravity bears witness. “Once you start to move out of that, a lot of good things happen,” Pandolfi says. “You know who you are, and how to do your thing with confidence and experience. This colors the songwriting process as much as anything. We work so hard on the music, but it's not hard work. It's really the payoff, and it comes more naturally with time.”

Letting the past inform and the present propel, the Stringdusters' style and substance are uniquely Infamous. Since 2007, the band's ever-evolving artistry and boldly creative collaborations — including Ryan Adams, Joss Stone, Bruce Hornsby, Joan Osborne, and Lee Ann Womack — have pushed them past the edges of traditional acoustic music and carved out a musical niche all their own in the hearts of fans and critics, alike. Over the past couple of years, they released 2015's Undercover, a covers EP, followed by 2016's Ladies & Gentlemen, an album featuring multiple female guest vocalists. Those projects may have seemed like artistic tangents, but they actually proved to be a pretty direct route from there to Gravity.

“Being singers and songwriters, we were really ready to put some of our own songs out with us singing them,” Falco says. “In the same way solo projects can take you away to be able to come back and feel refreshed, the last two records have done that and we were ready to hit the studio with our songs sung by us.”

“We had much more of a vision for how we wanted this album to come together than we did with past projects,” Pandolfi adds. “We got the music, including all our individual parts, to a place where we knew we could go into the studio and just let it happen live. We are a band. We play live together and, more than any one song or achievement, this is what we do. Now we have an album that captures that.”

Part of Gravity's vision involved not road-testing and adapting the songs before taking them into the studio. That's a new step in the Stringdusters' process which starts with filtering through and whittling down a wealth of material to the best of the batch. “We take those 20 or so songs and take them to the next level as a band,” Pandolfi explains. “So much gets accomplished in this writing/arranging stage. It's where songs become Stringduster songs. In the end, we share the songwriting credit because of all the collective work that goes into this (and every other) aspect of being in a band.”

“We may try the song in a number of different feels before landing on something that works for the sound of the band. If a song is good, it usually comes together fairly quickly,” Halls says, adding, “But we’re writing more diverse stuff these days, so some experimentation is always welcome.”
While the new record boasts a single instrumental track, “Sirens,” where the five fellas really cut loose on their respective strings, the vocals across the other dozen tracks tie this music to the bluegrass tradition in an even more profound way. “Singing is a big part of bluegrass music,” Falco says. “It’s an important part of the sound and I think that part of music gets overlooked a lot. The singing should convey the emotion of the song. That's what we aim to do. One could argue that it's more important than the playing.”

Out beyond Laws of Gravity, the Infamous Stringdusters have an even broader vision. “We just want to keep making original music, keep evolving as people and musicians, and continue to help our amazing community of fans grow and enjoy this experience together,” Pandolfi says. “When we hear from people that our music or the community around our music has helped them find joy in life, it makes everything seem very worthwhile.”

Falco adds, “We love playing together and that’s the reason we’ve been doing it for as long as we have. We want to able to do this until we’re old and grey. That’s really it — making music together and continuing to evolve our brand of bluegrass music.”
Members of of Sunsquabi
Members of of Sunsquabi
A three-piece suit named SunSquabi has been catching the eyes and ears of music fans around the world with their break out year in 2016. The band unveiled their debut EP with All Good Records, titled, “Odyssey” which featured artists GRiZ and Dominic Lalli of Big Gigantic. “Odyssey” takes listeners through an electro funk filled journey and gives an in depth look at where they have come musically with this project. SunSquabi spent the better part of 2016 touring nationwide and made debut appearances at Electric Forest, Summer Camp, Camp Bisco, High Sierra, Summer Set, Summer Meltdown, and Hulaween to name a few. The Colorado trio is now reaching more listeners and performing in front of larger audiences every time out.

2017 will feature the bands 2nd release on GRiZ’s All Good Records titled “Deluxe EP” due out in February 2017. The first single “Pygmy Up feat. Russ Liquid” has already been released and has hit the 100,000 play mark in just under 1 month. Look for “Deluxe EP” to continue where “Odyssey” left off and provide listeners more of the SunSquabi sound they have come to love.

SunSquabi continues to break down and analyze the expectations of what a “Live-Electronic” band should be. SunSquabi is dedicated to their ever-evolving craft in the studio and on the live stage. It’s no wonder the twenty-something’s in SunSquabi have gained the national attention for their unique sound. The band has multiple answers when asked to describe their sound, but most often describe it as an Electronic Hydro Funk Experience due to the fluidity of the music.

“SunSquabi makes it look easy – so groovy & smooth!” – All Good Records
Eddie Roberts (The New Mastersounds), Chuck Jones (Dopapod), Congo Sanchez (Thievery Corporation)
Eddie Roberts (The New Mastersounds), Chuck Jones (Dopapod), Congo Sanchez (Thievery Corporation)
Eddie Roberts (The New Mastersounds) , Chuck Jones (Dopapod), Congo Sanchez (Thievery Corporation) & Joey Porter (The Motet)
One Flew West
One Flew West
Formed in the Summer of 2010 in the small town of Longmont, Colorado, One Flew West has grown from a high school garage band into a full-scale rock machine storming up and down the front range. Now based in Denver, the four-piece has made a lasting mark on the local music scene and look to make that mark on the national scene in the near future. Uniquely combining rock and roll with various aspects of folk, pop and punk rock, there are few bands out there that sound like One Flew West making it difficult to fill in the cliché definition of, "They sound like so-and-so". The band has been recognized by numerous Colorado-based radio stations and publications as a soon-to-break-out artist. Known for their high-energy live shows and multi-dimensional songwriting, One Flew West has built up a dedicated fan base and is on their way to the national touring circuit. Their Selective Memory EP came out in October of 2015 and instantly made a splash throughout Colorado and into the Rocky Mountain region. In the spring of 2017, the band released two singles, "All In My Head" and "Ten Years Later" to glowing reviews leaving fans and the community eager for more.
Venue Information:
Boulder Theater
2032 14th Street
Boulder, CO, 80302
http://www.bouldertheater.com/